Dr. Michael Maxwell

Dr. Maxwell earned a PhD in Animal Behavior at UC Davis, and a BA in Biology with a specialization in Ecology, Evolution and Behavior at UC San Diego. He conducted postdoctoral research at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography (San Diego, CA), the Marine Biological Laboratory (Woods Hole, MA), and the National Marine Fisheries Service as a National Research Council scholar.

Dr. Maxwell teaches General Biology (BIO 162), Ecology (BIO 330), Evolution (BIO 310), Animal Behavior (BIO 420), and Natural History of California (BIO 450). Dr. Maxwell encourages students to conduct independent research projects with NU faculty, and welcomes inquiries about these projects from students.

As a behavioral ecologist and zoologist, Dr. Maxwell has examined diverse topics and questions in biology. Currently, he investigates the mating behavior and ecology of praying mantises in California. Previous projects include mating behavior and paternity in squid, population dynamics and fishery management of squid, population dynamics of baleen whales, and behavioral studies of primates in the field (olive baboons in Kenya) and in captivity (mandrills and golden monkeys).

Dr. Maxwell’s current research examines reproductive physiology and behavior in a California praying mantis (Stagmomantis limbata). In this species, the female may cannibalize the male during or after mating, potentially converting the male’s body mass into eggs. Females, however, mate with multiple males in nature, which casts doubt on a cannibalized male’s paternity. Dr. Maxwell is investigating the use of genetic markers to determine the fertilization success of cannibalized males. Dr. Maxwell also collaborates with international scientists to examine peculiarities of mating behavior in other arthropods.

Presentations

Type Date Title Audience Function Location
Lecture 2016-03-16 Polyandry in the praying mantis Stagmomantis limbata: a genetic approach. Faculty Spring Symposium. National University. National University
Lecture 2015-09-09 Polyandry in the praying mantis Stagmomantis limbata: evaluating competing hypothesis. Faculty Spring Symposium. National University. National University
Lecture 2015-05-14 Dangerous decisions: male choice and sexual cannibalism in praying mantises University of California (Dept. Entomology); Riverside UC Riverside
Conference 2014-11-20 Test of the sexual partner misidentification hypothesis in the praying mantis (Mantis religiosa). Zoológia 2014 Conference University of Presov, Slovakia
Lecture 2014-08-03 Intraspecific and interspecific length variation in mantids: consequences for prey size and predatory strike rates. 10th European Congress of Entomology (Part of Symposium: "Diversity of form and function within the Mantodea (praying mantises)." University of York, UK.
Poster 2014-08-03 Gift carrying in the spider Pisaura mirabilis: nuptial gift contents in nature and effects on male running speed and fighting success. 10th European Congress of Entomology. University of York, UK.
Paper 2012-09-01 Variation in developmental schedules results in variation in adult body size in the praying mantis Stagmomantis limbata National University La Jolla, CA
Paper 2012-02-01 Causes and consequences of variation in body size in the praying mantis Stagmomantis limbata La Jolla, CA
Paper 2011-03-01 Behavioral and morphological diversity in praying mantises La Jolla, CA
Paper 2010-12-01 Behavioral and morphological variation within the Mantodea San Diego, CA
Paper 2010-08-01 Sexual conflict in the wood cricket (Nemobius sylvestris): males prevent early spermatophore removal Budapest, Hungary
Paper 2010-08-01 Male choice in a sexually cannibalistic praying mantid (Stagmomantis limbata): males prefer well-fed females Budapest, Hungary
Paper 2010-04-01 Male choice in praying mantids: is it ecologically viable? La Jolla, CA
Paper 2009-05-01 Male choice in sexually cannibalistic praying mantids: males prefer well-fed females National University La Jolla, CA
Paper 2009-04-01 Intraspecific and interspecific mate attraction in praying mantids San Diego, CA
Paper 2009-03-01 Male choice in sexually cannibalistic praying mantids: males prefer well-fed females San Diego, CA
Paper 2009-02-01 Food availability influences degree of polyandry in females of a gift-giving spider, Pisaura mirabilis Brno, Czech Republic
Paper 2008-07-01 Fatal attraction or just attraction? Evaluating alternative hypotheses on the occurrence of sexual cannibalism in praying mantids Durban, South Africa
Paper 2008-04-01 Multiple meals, multiple males: promiscuous mating behavior in the nuptially-feeding nursery web spider, Pisaura mirabilis. La Jolla, CA
Paper 2007-12-01 Pheromone use in a praying mantid (Stagmomantis limbata): towards evaluating alternative hypotheses on the occurrence of sexual cannibalism San Diego, CA
Paper 2007-09-01 Mate attraction via pheromones in a praying mantid: evaluating alternative hypotheses on the occurrence of sexual cannibalism. La Jolla, CA
Paper 2007-04-01 Examination of pheromone use in a praying mantid, Stagmomantis limbata. Australian National University Canberra, Australia
Paper 2006-04-01 Only his wings remained: sexual cannibalism and male mating behavior in praying mantises National University La Jolla, CA
Paper 2006-02-01 Oviposition behavior of wild genetic variants of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans University of California, San Diego San Diego, CA
Paper 2005-09-01 Sexual competition in the harlequin bug (Murgantia histrionica) University of Maryland Baltimore, MD

Publications

Type Date Author Type Date Title Publication Name Author List Publisher Volume / Issue / Page
Article – Peer Reviewed Co-Author Bird predation by praying mantises: a global perspective Wilson Journal of Ornithology Nyffeler, M., M.R. Maxwell And J.V. Remsen 129 331-344
Article – Peer Reviewed Co-Author Female predatory response to conspecific males and heterospecific prey in the praying mantis Mantis religiosa: evidence for discrimination of conspecific males. Journal of Ethology Prokop, P. And M.R. Maxwell 34 139-146
Article – Peer Reviewed Author A synoptic review of the genus Stagmomantis (Mantodea: Mantidae). Zootaxa 3765 501-525
Article – Peer Reviewed Co-Author Consequences of intraspecific variation in female body size in the mantid Stagmomantis limbata (Mantodea: Mantidae): feeding ecology, male attraction, and egg production Environmental Entomology Maxwell, M.R. And C. Frinchaboy 43 91-101
Article – Peer Reviewed Author Developmental patterns in Stagmomantis limbata (Mantodea: Mantidae): variation in instar number, growth, and body size. Journal of Orthoptera Research 23(1) 49-59
Article – Peer Reviewed Co-Author Gift carrying in the spider Pisaura mirabilis: nuptial gift contents in nature and effects on male running speed and fighting success Animal Behaviour Prokop, P. And M.R. Maxwell 83 1395-1399
Article – Peer Reviewed Co-Author Sexual conflict over spermatophore attachment in a nuptially-feeding cricket Ethology Prokop, P. And M.R. Maxwell 117 520-528
Article – Peer Reviewed Co-Author Multiple paternity within field-collected egg cases of the praying mantid Tenodera aridifolia Annals of the Entomological Society of America Watanabe, E., T. Adachi-Hagimori, K. Miura, M.R. Maxwell, Y. Ando And Y. Takamatsu 104 348-352
Article – Peer Reviewed Author Effects of female feeding regime in a sexually cannibalistic mantid: fecundity, cannibalism and male response in Stagmomantis limbata (Mantodea) Ecological Entomology Maxwell, M.R., K.M. Gallego And K.L. Barry 35 775-787
Article – Peer Reviewed Co-Author Examinations of female pheromone use in two praying mantids, Stagmomantis limbata and Tenodera aridifolia sinensis (Mantodea: Mantidae). Annals of the Entomological Society of America Maxwell, M.R., K.L. Barry And P.M. Johns 103 120-127
Dr. Michael Maxwell

Info

Dr. Michael Maxwell

College of Letters and Sciences

Mathematics & Natural Sciences

Education

UC Davis - PHD - Animal Science