Woman sitting downtown outside office buildings

Doctorate of Marriage and Family Therapy (DMFT)

computer monitor icon

100% Online DMFT

Complete your studies on your own time.

calendar icon

New start date every Monday

Start your first course when it’s convenient for you.

graduate cap icon

54 Months to your DMFT

Finish your DMFT in just 20 courses.

National and Northcentral have merged, and this program is now offered by NU. Learn more.

Home » Programs » Doctorate of Marriage and Family Therapy

Take the first step in your National University Journey

Courses Start Every Monday

Request Information

Doctorate of Marriage and Family Therapy

National University’s Doctorate of Marriage and Family Therapy (DMFT) program gives you the tools you need to prepare to advance in the field of couple and family therapy behavioral health field. This 100% online program provides high-quality education and training to help you gain the expertise to thrive.

As you work through the curriculum, you’ll get the skills you need to practice effectively and systemically. Program development and evaluation, grant writing, advanced systemic practice, advanced clinical education, research coursework, and more are the foundation used to take your behavioral health studies to the next level.

Prepare for a Marriage & Family Therapy Career

As a graduate of National University’s DMFT, you’ll be prepared to provide clinical services, supervise other clinicians, serve in administrative positions, and oversee mental health practices. 

Tailor your NU online DMFT to match your interests with one of these specializations: 

  • Child and Adolescent Therapy
  • Couple Therapy
  • General Family Therapy
  • Systemic Administration and Entrepreneurship
  • Systemic Organizational Leadership
  • Therapy with Military Families
WASC icon

The Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC) accredits public and private schools, colleges, and universities in the U.S.

Course Details

Credit Hours: 60

Courses: 20

Estimated Time to Complete: 54 months

The Doctorate of Marriage and Family Therapy (DMFT) degree program can be completed in 60 credits. Core and specialization courses are 8 weeks; practicum and dissertation courses run 12 weeks for this program.

This program can be completed with a minimum of 60 credit hours, but may require additional credit hours, depending on the time required to complete the doctoral project. If granted, additional courses will be added to the student degree program in alignment with the SAP and Academic Maximum Time to Completion policies. Students who do not complete their program in accordance with these policies may be dismissed.

Course Sequence

This doctoral-level course is designed for students without a background in relational/systemic clinical theory. It focuses on the key elements of relational/systemic ethics and clinical practice, including the theories commonly used in marriage and family therapy (MFT). The purpose of the course is to prepare students for the foundational and specialization courses in the DMFT program. In this course you will examine the core elements of relational/systemic ethics, systems theory and cybernetics, and MFT theories. An emphasis is on the implications of using a relational/systemic clinical lens, including how doing so impacts your professional identity.

In this course, you will be prepared for success in the doctorate of marriage and family therapy program (DMFT) at the University. You are introduced to relevant academic communities, professional standards, and doctoral-level expectations while completing an applied doctoral degree in MFT. In addition to a review of the evolution of the MFT field, you will examine the system-based framework and the various environments in which relational/systemic interventions can be applied. Critical thinking, research appraisal, and the role of culture in systemic practice are emphasized. You will also explore potential topics for an applied doctoral project. Upon course completion, you will have a professional growth plan that will contribute to the achievement of your professional goals.

This course focuses on the review of literature and scholarly writing in the field of Marriage and Family Therapy. The course emphasizes preparation for an applied doctoral project focused on issues at the local, community, or societal level. In this course, you will a) conduct effective literature searches; b) write comprehensive, critical, and synthesized reviews of the literature; c) explore and examine frameworks; d) explain ethical issues related to the topic; and e) address diverse, marginalized, and/or underserved populations in the literature and applied projects.

This doctoral-level course focuses on the fundamentals of developing human services programs from a marriage and family therapy (MFT) systemic/relational perspective. Students will review and analyze well-designed prevention, early intervention, and clinical treatment programs, and will understand the different stages and implementations of evidence-based programs. Then, students will develop a program of their choice using a standard format for program proposals: problem statement, goals and objectives, methodology or program description, evaluation plan, and executive summary. Throughout, students will apply systems theory and MFT concepts as appropriate to identify key contributions that MFTs can bring to the process of program development.

The purpose of this course is for you to document, in the beginning stage of your doctoral program, your academic, scholarly, clinical, and professional knowledge and skills. In this course, you will identify goals you will work to accomplish during the program as well as examine your personal and professional identity as a relational/systemic practitioner. You will refine your professional development plans and provide artifacts indicating you have acquired competencies in several key domains. This course must be successfully completed with at least a B grade prior to beginning the doctoral project courses and may only be retaken once.

This doctoral-level course focuses on the fundamentals of evaluation and monitoring of human services programs. The purpose of this course is to prepare students to conduct quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methods formative and summative program evaluations. Special emphasis is placed on evaluating programs and clinical outcomes using the systemic/relational perspective of Marriage and Family Therapy. The course will develop students’ abilities to collaborate with stakeholders in developing evaluation plans that ensure evaluation processes meet the needs of multiple stakeholders. Students will consider the various ethical implications of program evaluation and will identify ethical considerations in implementing an evaluation plan and reporting results.

This research methods course provides you with the skills needed to critique existing research and apply the findings to successfully complete an applied doctoral project. In this course you will explain the foundational aspects of MFT research and consider the elements involved in critiquing research relevant to different applied projects. You will also address ethical and diversity issues in relational/systemic research. You will apply this knowledge and these skills to develop an applied project outline.

The purpose of this course is for you to document, in the middle of your doctoral program, your academic, scholarly, clinical, and professional knowledge and skills. In this course, you will identify goals you will work to accomplish during the program as well as examine your personal and professional identity as a relational/systemic practitioner. You will refine your professional development plans and provide artifacts indicating you have acquired competencies in several key domains. This course must be successfully completed with at least a B grade prior to beginning the doctoral project courses and may only be retaken once.

In this course you will have an opportunity to demonstrate your relational/systemic competence. Emphasis is placed on demonstrating clinical skills with diverse populations, advanced application of relational/systemic models, ethical decision-making, cultural humility, case conceptualization, and professional growth. A goal of the course is for you to consolidate your previous clinical experience and approaches into your identity as a relational/systemic practitioner. In this course you will engage in clinical discussions, share examples of your clinical work, navigate person of the therapist issues, and explore the landscape of relational/systemic practice. You must be clinically active during the course and participate in weekly clinical supervision.

This practicum course provides students opportunities to enhance their ability to help MFT students begin their growth toward clinical competence and professional identity as an MFT. Students will be invited to participate in the supervision of the University’s MFT master’s students while receiving guidance from the University instructor on the development of their supervisory skills. The course will provide an opportunity to engage in discussions and practice of supervisory tasks enhancing students’ ability to further develop their identities as MFTs and future MFT supervisors.

In this course you will have an opportunity to demonstrate your relational/systemic competence. Emphasis is placed on demonstrating organizational and leadership skills with diverse populations, advanced application of relational/systemic models, ethical decision-making, cultural humility, organizational conceptualization, and professional growth. A goal of the course is for you to consolidate, develop and enhance your identity as a relational/systemic practitioner in organizational contexts. In this course you will engage in professional discussions, share examples of your organizational and leadership skills, navigate person of the leader issues, and explore the landscape of systemic organizational leadership. You must be professionally active during the course and participate in weekly consultation.

During this course you will carry out your internship contract by engaging in activities for 20 hours per week to advance your clinical, research, scholarly, and/or professional skills. You will meet weekly with a local supervisor/mentor who was chosen for their fit with your proposed internship activities. Your internship activities should reflect your program specialization. Towards the end of the course, you will submit the agreed upon deliverables for the internship experience, demonstrating progress on your own goals, as well as your growth relative to the learning outcomes for the course.

During this second internship course, you will continue to engage in your contracted activities for 20 hours per week, further advancing your clinical, research, scholarly, and/or professional skills. Throughout this course, you will meet weekly with a local supervisor/mentor who was chosen for their fit with your proposed internship activity. Your internship activities should reflect your program specialization. Toward the end of the course, you will submit the agreed upon deliverables for the internship experience, demonstrating progress on your own goals, as well as your growth relative to the learning outcomes for the course.

During this final internship course, you will continue to engage in your contracted activities for 20 hours per week, further advancing your clinical, research, scholarly, and/or professional skills. Throughout this course, you will meet weekly with a local supervisor/ mentor who was chosen for their fit with your proposed internship activities. Your internship activities should reflect your program specialization. Toward the end of the course, you will submit the agreed upon deliverables for the internship experience, demonstrating progress on your own goals, as well as your growth relative to the learning outcomes for the course.

In this course you will explore various relational/systemic methodologies, including those that might be used in applied doctoral projects. As you do so, you will analyze the foundations and key elements of each, as well as address relevant ethical and diversity-related issues. In addition, as you examine the different types of applied scholarship, you will identify those that seem most relevant to your proposed doctoral project and will sketch an initial blueprint for applying them in your doctoral project.

The purpose of this course is for you to document, near the end of your doctoral program, your academic, scholarly, clinical, and professional knowledge and skills. In this course, you will identify goals you will work to accomplish during the program as well as examine your personal and professional identity as a relational/systemic practitioner. You will refine your professional development plans and provide artifacts indicating you have acquired competencies in several key domains. This course must be successfully completed with at least a B grade prior to beginning the doctoral project courses and may only be retaken once.

In this 12-week course, you will complete all relevant subsections of Section 1: Foundation. You will use your school-specific template and guidance from your chair to determine which subsections apply to your individual work. Section 1 must be completed and approved by your committee in order to pass the course and move forward. If you do not receive committee approval of Section 1, you will be able to take up to three supplemental 8-week courses to finalize and gain approval of Section 1.

In this 12-week course, you will compose all relevant subsections of Section 2: Methodology and Design and complete your proposal. Both of these components must be approved by your committee in order to pass the course and move forward. You will use your school-specific template and guidance from your chair to determine which subsections apply to your individual work. If you do not receive approval of Section 2 and the complete proposal, you will be able to take up to three 8-week supplementary courses to finalize and gain approval of Section 2 and your completed proposal.

In this course, you will prepare, submit, and obtain a determination from the Institutional Review Board (IRB) application before collecting data and, if applicable, executing your project modeling. You will also submit documentation that you have closed data collection. If you are still collecting data or modeling your project at the end of this 12-week course, you will be able to take up to three supplemental 8-week courses to complete the required components.

In this 12-week course, you will complete all relevant subsections of Section 3: Findings, Implications, and Recommendations, finalize your manuscript, and disseminate your findings. You will use your school-specific template and guidance from your chair to determine which subsections apply to your individual work. The final manuscript, which includes Section 3 and the dissemination of findings, must be approved by your committee in order to pass the course and be eligible to graduate. If you do not receive committee approval of all components, you will be able to take up to three supplemental 8-week courses to finalize these requirements and be eligible to graduate.

Core course options

Students may choose one of the following:

This doctoral-level course focuses on the fundamental concepts of and approaches to grant writing and responses to Requests for Proposals (RFPs). The purpose of this course is to prepare students to seek, identify, and respond to different types of funding opportunities. Special emphasis is placed on developing applications and responses using the systemic/relational conceptual framework of Marriage and Family Therapy as a template for developing prevention, early intervention, or full-scale/multidisciplinary programs. Particular focus will be devoted to using internet resources to access grantors’ grant and program announcements, requests for proposals, strategic plans, and funding priorities. You will consider the ethical and political implications of various funding sources in pursuing funds.

This course provides an analysis of the means by which trainees acquire their new professional identity as MFTs. Special emphasis is placed on gender, cultural, and socioeconomic factors in professional identity development.

This courses focuses on theories and current best practices for teaching adult learners. One of the key concepts is helping adult learners make best use of their previous experiences to help them on their new journey of learning. A special focus of this course in working with adult learners in e-learning environments.

This course builds on the foundation of MFT8970 MFT Supervision. Supervisors have an ethical and legal responsibility to assess the competence of their trainees. This course examines educational and experiential strategies for assessing trainee competence, and interventions the supervisor can employ to meet the ethical requirement for assessing trainee competence. A special focus of this course is the power differential between supervisor and trainee, and trainee and client.

Since its earliest days, the profession of MFT has made use of the best available technology to facilitate training the next generation of therapists. Historic examples include co-therapy, the one-way mirror, and the “bug in the ear.” This course examines the relationship between technology and best practices for adult learners, including both ethical and andragogical considerations, with a special focus on emerging digital technology.

What makes a person an effective leader? This doctoral level course will engage students in developing a better understanding of the leadership role, styles, philosophy, and behaviors. The students will also examine and apply the concepts of general systems theory (GST) and their application to the creation of a successful leadership style.

Students will learn the building blocks to cultivating a vision–from dream to service agency from the ground up. The course will focus on how to develop a non-profit counseling agency including financial planning, personnel development, and evidence-based service delivery. This doctoral level course will also prepare students for leadership in community-based agencies with an emphasis on integrating marriage and family therapy into the larger milieu of behavioral health services. Whether joining an existing agency or creating your own, today’s leaders can help create a socially conscious company culture using ethical decision-making models.

This course invites doctoral students to consider the key role that policy making plays in advancing the profession of marriage and family therapy (MFT). The course will start out by identifying stakeholders who direct and sanction the practice of MFT, from accrediting bodies and universities to state licensing boards and federal legislation. Students will learn about the role of MFTs in public health policies and advocating for MFTs in the larger behavioral health culture. The signature assignment for the course will have students challenging conventional leadership and proposing a relevant piece of legislation that is consistent with the systemic perspective.

MFTs today can excel in teaching, communication, and utilizing technology. Universities today need systemic thinkers who can integrate the demands of accreditation standards into traditional and cutting-edge academic and administrative systems. This doctoral level course will prepare students for administrative roles in online and on-ground education systems. Learners will incorporate best practices in teaching through role plays and assignments that develop course and curriculum development.

** Relational / Systemic Theories & Applications Course Options

Students may choose one of the following:

Relational/systemic practice is not bound to the therapy room and carries relevance beyond the family system. In this course you will examine the key elements of relational dynamics and cybernetics as they present in larger macrosystems. You will then explore the application of these concepts relative to the assessment and intervention of organizational and social systems, such as state and federal government, corporations, organizations, and polarized cultural groups. The overall focus of this course will equip you to strategize systemic change on a broader scale through methods that target second/third-order cybernetic change. Emphasis will be placed on engaging such large-scale change in a manner that is culturally sensitive and ethical.

This doctoral-level course invites students to look at an organization from a systems-based perspective, examining the patterns of interactions, current events, and managerial solutions, while keeping in mind foundational concepts of general systems theory (GST). Students will learn how to use their systemic training to consult with personnel from a variety of organizations including medical field, academia, corporations, justice system, faith-based organizations, military, sports organizations, and family businesses. Students will have an opportunity to design a proposal to offer systems consultation services.

This course provides an advanced overview of the theoretical literature related to the practice of marriage and family therapy. The course offers an opportunity to critically examine systems theories from cybernetics to natural systems. Students will also have an opportunity to reflect on common factors influencing MFT clinical practice and integration of various systems-based models.

This course examines the theoretical and empirical contributions to the understanding of diverse couple and family systems. The specific focus of the course is on the processes and dynamics of interaction within these relationships, highlighting that from a life course perspective, these dynamics change over time. The course will include content on the history of family life and diverse family types, exploring various family structures and roles. Legal processes related to families will also be reviewed. Conceptualizations of effective functioning in couple and families will be studied and various factors that impact couple and family systems will be addressed.

Program at a Glance

8 professionally relevant specializations
Total Credit Hours: At Least 63 Credit Hours
Courses: 21 Courses
Recommended Completion Time: 52 Months
Next Start Date: Every Monday
Classroom Size: One

The DMFT degree requires a minimum of 60 credit hours at the graduate level beyond the master’s degree.

NU may accept a maximum of 12 semester credit hours in transfer toward the doctoral degree for graduate coursework completed toward a doctoral degree at an accredited college or university with a grade of “B” or better. Transfer credit is only awarded for coursework that is evaluated to be substantially equivalent in content with the required coursework for the DMFT program.

The Doctorate of Marriage and Family Therapy (all specializations) has the following graduation requirements:

  • A minimum of 48 credit hours of graduate instruction must be completed through NU
  • Successful completion of all required degree program courses with a Grade Point Average of 3.0 (letter grade of “B”) or higher
  • Official documents on file for basis of admission: a conferred master’s degree from an accredited academic institution
  • Official transcripts on file for all transfer credit hours accepted by the University
  • All financial obligations must be met before the student will be issued their complimentary diploma and/or degree posted transcript 

Beyond these standard graduation requirements, the DMFT program has the following degree requirements:

  1. Online Video Conferencing. In order to complete some of the course requirements, students are required to participate in online video conferencing meetings throughout their time in the program. In order to participate in these video conference sessions, students are required to own or otherwise have access to a computer, a webcam, a headset, a video recording device, and a high-speed Internet connection.
  2. Doctoral Internship. DMFT students are required to complete a 9-month, 20 hour a week, doctoral internship that aligns with their doctoral specialization. Students are required to have a local supervisor with whom they can meet in-person for a minimum of 4 hours per month (i.e., one hour per week). For more information, please read the practicum and internship course descriptions.
  3. Liability Insurance. Prior to beginning any clinical experience, DMFT students are required to submit proof of professional liability insurance.
  4. Supervision Coursework. In addition to advanced coursework in marriage and family therapy, students in the DMFT program must complete a course in MFT supervision methodology. Students seeking to qualify for the Approved Supervisor designation will have to complete the direct supervision and supervision mentoring requirements outside of the program.
  5. Doctoral Comprehensive Evaluation (Portfolio). In pursuit of an applied doctoral degree at NU, students will gain expertise in their academic discipline and in one or more specializations that complement their academic discipline. The three doctoral portfolio courses are intended to assure that students provide artifacts indicating that they have acquired competencies in the following domains: program and professional goals, a relevant course of study, professional experience and plans, research experience and plans, clinical experience and plans, internship outcomes, documentation of academic growth, and the first draft of a dissertation prospectus. The DMFT Portfolio is a living document with major updates throughout the program.
  6. Doctoral Project. The capstone of applied doctoral training is the completion of an applied project process. The DMFT program uses a facilitated capstone process that is purposefully designed to help students follow a step-by-step sequence in the preparation and completion of a doctoral project. For students in the DMFT program, the applied project must be related to marriage and family therapy and be consistent with the student’s selected area of specialization. (Note: The applied project portion of the DMFT program can be completed with a minimum of 12 credit hours in Applied Doctoral Experience [ADE] Courses, but may require additional credit hours, depending on the time the student takes to complete the project).

Career Potential*

  • College/university administrator
  • College professor/instructor
  • Couple and family therapist
  • Behavioral health clinical director
  • Clinical supervisor
  • Systemic organizational consultant
  • And many more in public and private facilities of all different sizes!

*Positions may require additional experience, training, and other factors beyond successfully completing this degree program. Depending on where you reside, many positions may also require state licensure, and it is the responsibility of the student to ensure that all licensure requirements are met. We encourage you to also review program specific requirements with an NU advisor. Any data provided on this page is for informational purposes only and does not guarantee that completion of any degree program will achieve the underlying occupation or commensurate salary.

Specializations

The Child and Adolescent Therapy Specialization is designed to prepare students to work in therapy settings with children and adolescents from a family therapy/systems perspective. Students in this specialization are required to focus their course projects, internship work, and doctoral project on issues related to working with children and adolescents. Twelve (12) credit hours of coursework are devoted to Child and Adolescent Therapy.

Specialization Courses – 12 Credit Hours Total. Each course is 3 semester credits and runs 8 weeks.

Learn More

The Couple Therapy Specialization is designed to prepare students to work primarily with couples in therapy settings from a family therapy/systems perspective. Students in this specialization are required to focus their course projects, internship work, and doctoral project on issues related to working with couples. Twelve (12) credit hours of coursework are devoted to Couple Therapy.

Specialization Courses – 12 Credit Hours Total. Each course is 3 semester credits and runs 8 weeks.

Learn More

The General Family Therapy specialization allows students to select courses from a broad range of electives to fit their personal and professional ambitions. In this specialization, students select four courses (12 credit hours) from the Marriage and Family Therapy curriculum at the 8000 level. Courses from the Department of Psychology may be considered to fill this requirement with approval on a case-by-case basis. Students in this specialization are required to focus their course projects, internship work, and doctoral project on issues related to marriage and family therapy. Four additional courses (theory or treatment-focused) chosen from any of the Department of Marriage and Family Sciences (DMFS) specialization courses (or from Psychology with approval) listed in the Catalog that will help the student develop the desired expertise.

Learn More

The Therapy with Military Families Specialization is designed to prepare students to work primarily with individuals, couples, and families who are affiliated with the military using a family therapy/systems perspective. Students in this specialization are required to focus their course projects, internship work, and doctoral project on issues related to working with military personnel and their families. Twelve (12) credit hours of coursework are devoted to Therapy with Military Families.

Specialization Courses – 12 Credit Hours Total. Each course is 3 semester credits and runs 8 weeks.

Learn More

The Systemic Administration and Entrepreneurship is designed to prepare students to use their relational/systemic skills in a variety of contexts such as, private practice, mental health agencies and organizations, business or schools. Students can focus their specialization on the leadership, managerial, or practitioner role in such settings. Students in this clinical specialization are required to focus their course projects, internship work, and doctoral projects on issues broadly related to administration and/or entrepreneurship. Twelve (12) hours of coursework are devoted to systemic administration and entrepreneurship. A unique aspect of this specialization is that students may select up to two of their four specialization courses from the School of Business or the Department of Psychology. 

Specialization Courses – 12 Credit Hours Total. Each course is 3 semester credits and runs 8 weeks.

Learn More

The Systemic Organizational Leadership is designed to prepare students to assume leadership roles in agencies and organizations. Students will be taught to apply systems theory to leadership roles and functioning within organizations. This is a non-clinical specialization in that students will complete their practicum and internship in organizational settings and activities, rather than clinical work. Students in this specialization will also focus course assignments and doctoral project on issues related to systemic leadership. Twelve credit hours of coursework are devoted to systemic organizational leadership. Up to two of four specialization courses can be taken outside of the Department of Marriage and Family Sciences. 

Specialization Courses – 12 Credit Hours Total. Each course is 3 semester credits and runs 8 weeks.

Learn More

Program Learning Outcomes

As a graduate of National University’s Doctorate of Marriage and Family Therapy (DMFT) degree program, you’ll be able to:

  • Cultivate competence in working with diverse populations in professional settings
  • Appraise ethical conduct in professional contexts
  • Prepare applied projects designed to make a measurable difference
  • Develop relational/systemic knowledge and skills

Admissions

Enrolling in a university is a big decision. That’s why our dedicated admissions team is here to guide you through the admissions process and help you find the right program for you and your career goals.

To that end, we’ve simplified and streamlined our application process, so you can get enrolled in your program right away. Because we accept and review applications year round, you can begin class as soon as next month, depending on your program and location of choice.

Learn more about undergraduate, graduate, military, and international student admissions, plus admissions information for transfer students. You can also learn more about our tuition rates and financial aid opportunities.

To speak with our admissions team, call (855) 355-6288 or request information, and an advisor will contact you shortly. If you’re ready to apply, simply start your application today

Man in a button-down shirt smiles at a young boy in glasses who also wears a backpack
Weekly Course Starts
Our course structure is built to make earning your degree accessible and achievable by offering a rigorous, yet flexible program that works with your schedule.

Why Choose Doctorate of Marriage and Family Therapy at National University

  • Eight and Twelve Week Courses
  • Online Delivery
  • Year-Round Enrollment
  • One-to-One Teaching and Learning
  • Courses Taught by Doctoral Faculty
  • Military Friendly

We’re proud to be a Veteran-founded, San Diego-based nonprofit. Since 1971, our mission has been to provide accessible, achievable higher education to adult learners. Today, we educate students from across the U.S. and around the globe, with over 230,000 alumni worldwide.

head shot image of man named Francisco

“National University has impacted my career. You can immediately apply what you learn in class to your business.”

-Francisco R., Class of 2016

A mother sits on a couch with a laptop and smiles at her toddler-aged son, who is looking forward.
FLEXIBLE SCHEDULE
We know your life may not happen on a 9-5 schedule, so we offer courses online in a flexible one-to-one teaching and learning model.
white scholarship oppotunities icon

The Key Grant Scholarship

Do you qualify for a needs-based scholarship? Learn more about the NU Key Grant Scholarship and other scholarship opportunities to unlock the door to your dreams!

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

Marriage and family therapy (MFT) is a profession that uses a systems theory orientation to treat individuals, couples, families, and groups who struggle with mental and emotional disorders as well as a wide range of behavioral and relationship problems. Marriage and family therapy is a distinct profession from that of psychology, counseling, social work, and other mental health professions. More detailed information about marriage and family therapy can be found in the links below.

Marriage and Family Therapists:

https://www.aamft.org/About_AAMFT/About_Marriage_and_Family_Therapists
https://www.aamft.org/build_your_career/default.aspx
http://www.allpsychologyschools.com/marriage-and-family-therapy/
http://www.psychotherapynotes.com/

It can be beneficial if you’ve earned your Bachelor’s degree in a related field, such as Family Studies or Psychology, but it isn’t required.

  • All of the content necessary to train as a Marriage and Family Therapist is included in our MFT Master’s program.
  • Apart from having a specific undergraduate degree, it’s just as valuable to have a strong dedication to this challenging field of study.

Some of our students volunteer, and some are paid for their time. Either is acceptable. Whether you are paid or not depends on the opportunities available in your area. Some states may specifically require volunteer work while you are a student rather than a paid placement.

Program Disclosure

Successful completion and attainment of National University degrees do not lead to automatic or immediate licensure, employment, or certification in any state/country. The University cannot guarantee that any professional organization or business will accept a graduate’s application to sit for any certification, licensure, or related exam for the purpose of professional certification.

Program availability varies by state. Many disciplines, professions, and jobs require disclosure of an individual’s criminal history, and a variety of states require background checks to apply to, or be eligible for, certain certificates, registrations, and licenses. Existence of a criminal history may also subject an individual to denial of an initial application for a certificate, registration, or license and/or result in the revocation or suspension of an existing certificate, registration, or license. Requirements can vary by state, occupation, and/or licensing authority.

NU graduates will be subject to additional requirements on a program, certification/licensure, employment, and state-by-state basis that can include one or more of the following items: internships, practicum experience, additional coursework, exams, tests, drug testing, earning an additional degree, and/or other training/education requirements.

All prospective students are advised to review employment, certification, and/or licensure requirements in their state, and to contact the certification/licensing body of the state and/or country where they intend to obtain certification/licensure to verify that these courses/programs qualify in that state/country, prior to enrolling. Prospective students are also advised to regularly review the state’s/country’s policies and procedures relating to certification/licensure, as those policies are subject to change.

National University degrees do not guarantee employment or salary of any kind. Prospective students are strongly encouraged to review desired job positions to review degrees, education, and/or training required to apply for desired positions. Prospective students should monitor these positions as requirements, salary, and other relevant factors can change over time.