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Bachelor of Science in
Nursing – Generic Entry

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Home » Programs » Bachelor of Science in Nursing – Generic Entry

Program Overview

The Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) program prepares you to develop critical thinking, communication, and therapeutic nursing skills within the framework of trans-cultural nursing. Upon graduation, you’ll have the skills and expertise needed to manage the nursing care of culturally diverse clients in a variety of settings.

The baccalaureate degree program in nursing, master’s degree program in nursing, and post-graduate APRN certificate programs at National University is accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education, 655 K Street NW, Suite 750, Washington, DC 20001, 202-887-6791.

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Course Details

Course Listing

Required General Education Preparation

  • 21 courses; 84 quarter units

The following areas of General Education must be completed prior to beginning any Nursing Major core coursework: Area A1, A2, Area B, Area C, Area E, and Area F.

AREA A: ENGLISH COMMUNICATION

  • 9.0 quarter units

CATEGORY – 1 Writing

  • 1 course; 4.5 quarter units

An introductory course on the written academic discourse patterns required for college-level writing. Emphasizing essay-length compositions, the course covers critical reading, thesis formation, essay organization, and basic revision techniques.

CATEGORY 2 – Speech and Communication

  • 1 course; 4.5 quarter units

This class is an introduction to the principles and application of speaking effectively to diverse audiences in a variety of settings. Focus is on topic selection, organization, analysis of research, and delivery, with special attention on learning effective delivery skills.

AREA B: MATHEMATICAL CONCEPTS AND QUANTITATIVE REASONING

  • 1 course; 4.5 quarter units

Course Name

An introduction to concepts, procedures and software used in the statistical analysis of data in the health professions.

AREA C: INFORMATION LITERACY AND TECHNOLOGY

  • 1 course; 4.5 quarter units

Course Name

PrerequisiteENG 102

A cross-disciplinary course that teaches effective report and research paper writing through the use of key computer technologies. Topics include library and Internet research; information organization, evaluation, and synthesis; MLA and APA style formats; and the use of document-production, image-editing, and presentation software.

AREA D: ARTS, HUMANITIES, AND LANGUAGES

  • 4 courses; 18 quarter units

See the General Education section of the catalog for applicable courses

Course Name

This course provides English-speaking students the necessary tools for communication with Spanish speakers in the work place.

An examination of the basic cultural differences generally encountered in the workplace. Special emphasis is given to cross-cultural communication in the workplace.

For the remaining 9 units (2 courses), see the General Education section of the catalog for applicable courses.

AREA E: SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES

  • 2 courses; 9 quarter units

Course Name

A survey of the field of psychology that provides an overview of the scientific principles and theories in psychology. Topics include: biological psychology, abnormal behavior, motivation, emotion, sexuality and gender, and personality theory.

PrerequisiteENG 102

Critical introduction to basic sociology concepts. Examination of major theoretical perspectives and research methods. Topics include: economic stratification, race, gender, family, deviance, complex organizations.

AREA F: PHYSICAL AND BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

  • 6 courses; 18 quarter units

Course Name

CorequisiteBIO 191A, or BIO 201A; Recommended: Prior completion ofBIO 100; BIO 100A; CHE 101; CHE 101A

Areas of study include cells, tissues, organ systems (integumentary, skeletal, muscular and nervous), and their functional relation to each other. Topics also include the aging process and diseases in these systems, as well as the effects of genetics, diet, lifestyle, and the environment.

CorequisiteBIO 201; Recommended: Prior completion ofBIO 100; BIO 100A; CHE 101; CHE 101A or equivalent courses.

This laboratory course examines organ systems (skeletal, muscular and nervous). Students conduct cat/fetal pig dissections to identify and learn how skeletal muscles are organized according to body region. Sheep brain is used as a model to study human brain.

CorequisiteBIO 202A; PrerequisiteBIO 201 and BIO 201A

Organ systems (endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, urinary and reproductive), and their functional relation to each other. Topics also include the aging process and diseases in these systems, as well as the effects of genetics, diet, lifestyle, and the environment.

CorequisiteBIO 202; PrerequisiteBIO 201; BIO 201A

This laboratory course examines homeostasis in the heart, lungs, liver and kidneys, along with digestive, and urinary systems. Chromosomes, mitosis, meiosis, development and different types of inheritance through the testing of vision, hearing and taste and smell. Cat/fetal pig is used to study the internal organs.

CorequisiteBIO 203A Students should take both lecture and lab courses concurrently and with the same instructor to ensure a consistent learning experience. Students who are retaking one of the two courses or present special circumstances should petition for exception to this requisite.; Recommended: Prior completion ofBIO 100 and BIO 100A; CHE 101 and CHE 101A or equivalent courses; BIO 201 and BIO 201A; BIO 202 and BIO 202A

Biology of pathogenic and nonpathogenic microbes, including bacteria, fungi, protozoans, and viruses. The epidemiology of disease-causing agents is studied, along with the fundamentals of the human immune response. Students should take both lecture and lab courses concurrently and with the same instructor to ensure a consistent learning experience. Students who are retaking one of the two courses or present special circumstances should petition for exception to this requisite.

BIO 100A; CHE 101; CHE 101A; BIO 201 and BIO 201A; BIO 202 and BIO 202A

This laboratory course introduced students to procedures for handling microbes, methods of identification of microorganisms (microscopic and by diagnostic media), preparation of stained slides and wet mounts, aseptic techniques, isolation of a single colony, preparation of a pure culture, inoculation and interpretation of select diagnostic tests. This two-month course is a combination of lecture and laboratory activities. Students should take both lecture and lab courses concurrently and with the same instructor to ensure a consistent learning experience. Students who are retaking one of the two courses or present special circumstances should petition for exception to this requisite.

AREA A-G: GENERAL EDUCATION

  • 1 course; 4.5 quarter units

Course Name

PrerequisiteENG 102

Examines the origins of cultural pluralism in the USA and the valuing of diversity as a socio-cultural imperative. Explores the social history of race and ethnic relations in the USA from Colonial America to the present. Topics include voluntary and involuntary immigration, internal colonization, theoretical frameworks for understanding prejudice and discrimination, master narratives, the US Census, eugenics, immigration policy, and how gender and class complicate understandings of race and ethnicity in the USA.

PrerequisiteENG 102; PSY 100

A curriculum-wide elective that studies the psycho-socio-cultural aspects of human differences and the enhancement of interpersonal/ intercultural communication skills. Increases the knowledge and understanding of differences in people and perspectives, enhances learning and performance in multicultural environments and fosters interactive diversity as a socio-cultural imperative and behavioral norm.

For the remaining 16.5 quarter units, use General Education section of the catalog for applicable courses or nursing elective courses. 

Nursing Core Courses 

  • 25 courses; 94.5 quarter units

Course Name

PrerequisiteAdmission into the Bachelor of Science in Nursing and completion of all non-nursing pre-requisite courses is required to enroll in this course.

This course facilitates the practice of professional nursing by providing students with an opportunity to experiment with the application of various nursing theories to evaluate their impact on nursing practice. Professional identity, professional practice and professional development in nursing will be emphasized.

CorequisiteNSG 214A; Recommended PreparationAdmission into the nursing program and completion of required general education preparation with a minimum GPA 2.75

Introduction to foundational concepts of health assessment to systematically gather and analyze data using a patient-centered care approach. Concepts include obtaining a health-history, using therapeutic interviewing skills, performing a comprehensive head-to-toe and problem-focused physical exam, psycho-social and socio-cultural influences, and application of related current evidence. Concurrent enrollment in NSG 214A is required.

CorequisiteNSG 214 Admission into the nursing program and completion of required general education preparation with a minimum GPA 2.75.

Students will learn and engage in the practical application of a holistic patient-centered approach to health assessment as a basis for providing safe, quality nursing care. Students will practice the concepts learned in NSG 214. Current evidence will be utilized to demonstrate sociocultural variations on health assessment.

PrerequisiteBST 322

This course explores evidence-based practice as a foundation for improved nursing practice and healthcare outcomes. Strong emphasis is placed on the application of research theory to evidence-based practice, including ethics in research and application of the research process.

PrerequisiteNSG 214; NSG 214A

This course will present an overview of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of drugs, as well as drug classifications. Current issues in drug legislation, design, manufacturing and marketing will be explored. Emphasis will be placed on the role of the professional nurse in medication administration, including both expected and unexpected effects of drugs on patients.

PrerequisiteNSG 214; NSG 214A; NSG 304; NSG 403; NSG 422; CorequisiteNSG 240A

The purpose of this course is to introduce basic nursing concepts of health/illness continuum, patient-centered care, environment of care, legal, ethical, and regulatory requirements, and professional nursing roles. This course implements the utilization of the nursing process based on scientific evidence to provide holistic care for adult and geriatric populations with stable health and chronic medical conditions. Concurrent enrollment in NSG 240A is required unless approved by the Department Chair.

PrerequisiteNSG 214; NSG 214A; NSG 304; NSG 403; NSG 422; CorequisiteNSG 240

Students will begin to develop basic plans of care for adult and geriatric patients using nursing language. Practical application of beginning knowledge and skills required for nursing care of the adult and geriatric patients is demonstrated in both Lab and clinical settings through simulation and patient interaction. Students will practice skills in the Skills lab and then will progress to caring for patients with chronic and stable conditions in clinical settings. Each student will have opportunities to integrate theoretical information into nursing practice. Concurrent enrollment in NSG 240 is required unless approved by the Department Chair. Grading is S, U or I.

PrerequisiteNSG 240 and NSG 240A; CorequisiteNSG 245A

This course focuses on concepts relating to care of adult and geriatric populations with stable chronic and acute medical-surgical problems. Emphasis of this course is on the use of the nursing process and in developing competence in providing nursing care for individuals with specific health care needs and problems. In addition, the student is provided with an orientation to coordination of patient care. Concurrent enrollment in NSG 245A is required.

PrerequisiteNSG 240 and NSG 240A; CorequisiteNSG 245

Practical application of knowledge and skills required for nursing care of adult and geriatric patients with commonly occurring acute and chronic medical-surgical problems in laboratory and clinical settings. Concurrent enrollment in NSG 245 is required. Grading is by S, U or I.

PrerequisiteNSG 214; NSG 214A; CorequisiteNSG 330A

This course focuses on concepts relating to care of the adult and geriatric patients with acute, complex, and critical medical-surgical problems. This course emphasizes the utilization of current evidence in providing and evaluating interdisciplinary management of adult and geriatric patients to support positive outcomes. Concurrent enrollment in NSG 330A is required.

PrerequisiteNSG 214; NSG 214A; CorequisiteNSG 330

Practical application of knowledge and skills required for nursing care of adult and geriatric patients with acute and critical medical-surgical problems in laboratory and clinical settings. Concurrent enrollment in NSG 330 is required. Grading is S, U or I.

PrerequisiteNSG 330; NSG 330A; CorequisiteNSG 333A

The course focuses on the specialized health care needs of the childbearing family. Building on concepts from medical-surgical, pharmacology, research, and foundational nursing courses, health promotion, assessment, critical-thinking and therapeutic communication skills will be developed as they apply to care of culturally diverse childbearing families during the antepartum, intrapartum, and postpartum periods. Beginning with women’s health and infertility, fetal development, and normal physiology of pregnancy, acute pathophysiological disease processes affecting the mother and newborn will be included this course. Concurrent enrollment in NSG 333A is required.

PrerequisiteNSG 245; NSG 245A; CorequisiteNSG 333

This course covers practical application of knowledge and skills required for nursing care of families in the childbearing period. Using knowledge obtained in medical-surgical, foundational, pharmacological, and research courses along with knowledge gained in NSG333 theory, students will care for the patient and family during the antepartum, intrapartum, postpartum and newborn period. Concurrent enrollment in NSG 333 is required. NSG 333A is graded as Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory based upon successful completion of all course requirements.

PrerequisiteNSG 333 and NSG 333A; CorequisiteNSG 334A

The primary purpose of this course is the continuing examination of the family as a unit, this course focuses on nursing care related to the health needs of children and adolescents and their families. Emphasis is placed on the variations in health care due to behavioral, genetic, cultural, environmental, and developmental factors. Concurrent enrollment in NSG 334A is required.

PrerequisiteNSG 333 and NSG 333A; CorequisiteNSG 334

This course covers practical application of knowledge and skills required in nursing care for families with children. Using the language of nursing, students will care for the family with children as a unit, considering behavioral, life cycle, genetic, cultural and environmental factors. Concurrent enrollment in NSG 334 is required.

PrerequisiteNSG 330; NSG 330A; CorequisiteNSG 335A

This course demonstrates the relevance of mental health nursing concepts to all areas of professional practice. It provides a conceptual integration of the nursing process, theories, and research from the biopsychosocial sciences and humanities to promote mental health and provide care to all patients with mental disorders. Emphasis is placed on the use of therapeutic self and effective therapeutic communication to establish a therapeutic relationship among clients with mental health disorders. Concurrent enrollment in NSG 335A is required.

PrerequisiteNSG 330; NSG 330A; CorequisiteNSG 335

This course covers practical application of knowledge and skills required for nursing care across the lifespan with mentally ill patients with commonly occurring problems. Demonstration of skills takes place in clinical, laboratory and outpatient settings. Concurrent enrollment in NSG 335 is required. Clinical Laboratory is graded on a Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory basis based on successful completion of the course requirements.

PrerequisiteNSG 304; NSG 335; NSG 335A Successful Completion of NSG 335 and 335A

This course builds upon basic knowledge in nursing pharmacology and provides content essential to understanding the diseases and disease processes that can affect the body systems across the lifespan. Students focus on pathophysiological processes, incorporating use of clinical judgment and reasoning skills to distinguish alterations across multiple physiological systems.

CorequisiteNSG 460A Program requirement.

The primary purpose of this course is to examine the role of nursing in community health practice in the promotion of optimal health. Students will be exposed to the rich history of community and public health nursing and the importance of primary, secondary and tertiary levels of prevention in care delivery. Students will learn both family and community health assessment, diagnosis, intervention, and evaluation as well as the economic, structural, and systems influences on community health from a national perspective. Completion of this course partially fulfills the California Board of Nursing requirements for certification as a Public Health Nurse. Concurrent enrollment in NSG 460A is required unless approved by the Department Chair.

CorequisiteNSG 460

The Community Health clinical experience is designed to give the student practical experience in community health nursing that allows for the design, implementation and evaluation of healthcare services for individuals, families, and communities with the aim of improving health status. Students will draw upon nursing theories and frameworks to create appropriate interventions. The students will be able to complete a community assessment and determine the strengths and opportunities that exist in the community. Special focus will be given to vulnerable populations in low-resource communities. The student will be introduced to nursing’s role in promoting and protecting the health of populations in accordance with The American Nurses Association Scope and Standards of Public Health Nursing Practice. Completion of this course partially fulfills the California Board of Nursing requirements for certification as a Public Health NurseGrading is satisfactory (S) or unsatisfactory (U) only. Students must be enrolled concurrently in NSG 460.

PrerequisiteNSG 460 and NSG 460A; CorequisiteNSG 462A

The primary purpose of this course is to explore the national and global impact of community health nursing in population health. Students will learn how public health systems function to prevent diseases among vulnerable populations. They will learn how nurses function within healthcare teams to mobilize local, state, and national resources to mitigate disease and disasters. The student will also be introduced to various careers in public health. Completion of this course partially fulfills the California Board of Nursing requirements for certification as a Public Health Nurse. This course can be taught using face-to-face, online, or hybrid formats. Concurrent enrollment in NSG 462A is required.

PrerequisiteNSG 460 and NSG 460A; CorequisiteNSG 462

The community/public health clinical practicum experience focuses on nursing’s role in promoting and protecting the health of populations in accordance with The American Nurses Association Scope and Standards of Public Health Nursing Practice. Theories, principles, and strategies of population-based health care are used to design, implement, and evaluate services and plans of care to promote, maintain, and restore health in a defined population. Students focus on population aggregates in structured or unstructured settings across care environments. Strategies to evaluate health outcomes and costs of care are emphasized. Completion of this course partially fulfills the California Board of Nursing requirements for certification. Grading is satisfactory (S) or unsatisfactory (U) only. Students must be enrolled concurrently in NSG 462.

PrerequisiteNSG 335; NSG 335A; CorequisiteNSG 340A

The primary purpose of this course is to facilitate the development of a broad view of the management of health care delivery systems and the nurse leader’s role in that arena. Concurrent enrollment in NSG 340A is required unless approved by the Department Chair.

PrerequisiteNSG 335; NSG 335A; CorequisiteNSG 340

This course covers practical application of skills and knowledge required to coordinate care for multiple patients in a multidisciplinary setting. Collaborate with the nurse leaders in various clinical settings to promote quality improvement initiatives utilizing evidence-based practice. Concurrent enrollment in NSG 340 is required. Clinical Lab is graded on a Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory basis based on successful completion of the course requirements.

This course explores the historical roots and current impact on complex issues of nursing education, practice, and scholarship. Analysis of multiple interpretations of selected issues and strategies for resolving issues will be illustrated.

**Content required for licensure by CA Board of Registered Nursing

Optional Elective Course

Students may fulfill open units by completing the following courses.

PrerequisiteNSG 214 course with C or higher; NSG 214A course with C or higher; NSG 240 course with C or higher; NSG 240A course with C or higher; NSG 245 course with C or higher; NSG 245A course with C or higher; NSG 330 course with C or higher; NSG 330A course with C or higher; Students must have and maintain a GPA of 3.0 or higher in all NU nursing courses.

This course covers practical application of skills and knowledge required to coordinate care for multiple patients in a multidisciplinary setting. This course combines work experience with regular college instruction. Participants earn college credit while working in a position related to the role of BSN graduate.

PrerequisiteAdmission to nursing program and approve by Chair of Nursing

Elective course designed for students who demonstrate competency in nursing concepts and can work independently on specific project that does not fit into the context of regular scheduled nursing classes.

Requirements for LVNs and military students with approved Advanced Placement challenging NSG 245/A and higher

  • 1 course; 4.5 quarter units

PrerequisiteCompleted a Licensed Vocational Nursing/Licensed Practical Nurse (LVN/LPN) Program and hold a current licensure as an LVN/LPN., or Completed the Corps School/Military Training

The purpose of this course is to transition licensed LVNs and if applicable military personnel with medical experience and coursework to registered nursing practice by introducing concepts: professional registered nursing roles, scope of practice, and planning and implementing nursing care. This course implements the utilization of the nursing process based on evidence-based practices to provide holistic care to adult and geriatric populations with stable chronic and acute medical conditions. LVNs/Medics accepted for admission to the NU nursing program may be eligible to challenge nursing courses by examination(s) or be considered for equivalency. This course will evaluate content completed at LVN/Corps School programs to award college-level credit using transcript evaluation, credit-by-examination options, and competency-based education assessment of knowledge proficiency. Students will receive nursing course credits when their LVN/Core School transcripts equivalency criteria (time limit, credit, and content) are met. The time limit equivalency is 7 years or less. If time limit equivalency is not met, students may receive credit through challenge by course examination and skill validation and/or medication dosage examination. Applicants will receive course credit and advanced placement for successfully challenged courses. Co-requisite nursing courses will have to be challenged together. In other to receive credit for challenge courses, students must pass both co-requisite nursing courses. All course challenges by examination must be completed prior to the beginning of the first term in NU nursing program. The student who successfully challenges a course will receive a revised plan of study and must meet NU residency requirements.

Degree and Course Requirements

To receive a Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN), students must complete at least 180 quarter units as articulated below, 45 of which must be completed in residence at National University, 76.5 of which must be completed at the upper division level, and the University General Education requirements. In the absence of transfer credit, additional general electives may be necessary to satisfy total units for the degree. The following courses are specific degree requirements.

Program Learning Outcomes

  • Develop caring, therapeutic nursing relationships with individuals, families, and groups.
  • Provide safe, high quality, culturally competent, patient-centered nursing care for individuals across the life span in a variety of settings.
  • Participate in the continuous improvement of nursing care quality and safety.
  • Use nursing judgment to manage, prioritize, and delegate patient care in a variety of health care settings.
  • Effectively communicate and collaborate with patients and the interdisciplinary team.
  • Demonstrate professional identity by incorporating established standards of practice within the legal and ethical framework of nursing.
  • Apply best, current evidence into nursing practice to achieve desired outcomes.

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Program Disclosure

Successful completion and attainment of National University degrees do not lead to automatic or immediate licensure, employment, or certification in any state/country. The University cannot guarantee that any professional organization or business will accept a graduate’s application to sit for any certification, licensure, or related exam for the purpose of professional certification.

Program availability varies by state. Many disciplines, professions, and jobs require disclosure of an individual’s criminal history, and a variety of states require background checks to apply to, or be eligible for, certain certificates, registrations, and licenses. Existence of a criminal history may also subject an individual to denial of an initial application for a certificate, registration, or license and/or result in the revocation or suspension of an existing certificate, registration, or license. Requirements can vary by state, occupation, and/or licensing authority.

NU graduates will be subject to additional requirements on a program, certification/licensure, employment, and state-by-state basis that can include one or more of the following items: internships, practicum experience, additional coursework, exams, tests, drug testing, earning an additional degree, and/or other training/education requirements.

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