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ABA601 Assessment in ABA

Lead Faculty: Dr. Bill Matthew, PhD, BCBA-D, NCSP

Course Description

Introduces the student to the philosophy of behaviorism and the basic tenets of applied behavior analysis. Focuses on behavioral assessment and observation, and time series research design and its use in the scientific evaluation of behavior-environment relations.

Learning Outcomes

  • Given a written description and/or graph of a single subject research design (a) name it, (b) evaluate its procedural implementation, (c) discuss the situations for which it is appropriate and inappropriate, (d) explain the logic by which it controls extraneous variables, (e) evaluate it with respect to its ability to control extraneous variables, and (f) interpret the results.
  • Given the name of a design (a) describe the procedures for its implementation, (b) explain the logic by which it controls extraneous variables, (c) evaluate it with respect to its control of extraneous variables, (d) discuss the situations for which it is appropriate and inappropriate, (e) present a completely labeled figure with hypothetical data illustrating the design, and (f) interpret the results.
  • Compare and evaluate the various single system designs with respect to the types of research questions for which they are appropriate and their control of extraneous variables.
  • Given a behavior that needs to be changed, describe that behavior and other relevant behaviors in the same functional response class in observable terms such that it is amenable to systematic behavioral observation.
  • Use a variety of direct and indirect observational methods, such as narrative recording, anecdotal observation, whole and partial interval recording, momentary time sampling, even recording, duration recording, etc.
  • Using computer software (i.e., Excel), construct times series graphs.
  • When asked, be able to articulate orally or in writing, the basic philosophical tenets of behavior analysis, to include Skinner's conception of the role of private events in a natural science of behavior.
  • When asked, be able to explain orally or in writing the seven basic tenets of applied behavior analysis as articulated by Baer, Wolf Risley (1968).