Dr. Mario Mota

College of Letters and Sciences
Mathematics and Natural Sciences

Dr. Mota earned a PhD in Wildlife Ecology and Conservation at the University of Florida, a MS in Biology at the University of Central Florida with a specialization in Anatomy and Physiology and a BA in Biology at Rutgers University. He conducted his postdoctoral research at the University of Central Florida, where he taught before joining National University as full-time faculty.

At National University, Dr. Mota teaches Vertebrate Biology (BIO 416 & 416A), General Biology (BIO 163), General Biology Laboratory (BIO 169A), Human Anatomy and Physiology II and Lab (BIO 202/A), and Oceanography (EES 322). Future classes will be Marine Biology (BIO 460) and Marine Biology Field Studies (BIO 461)

Dr. Mota’s research focuses primarily on the nesting ecology and physiology of loggerhead (Caretta caretta) and green (Chelonia mydas) sea turtles in East Central Florida and Belize. Some of his ongoing projects include investigating how the physical and microbial properties of beach sand influence the incubation environment, how embryonic development is impacted by O2 and CO2 gas concentrations, hatchling energetics and swimming vigor, the genetic variability between nesting populations, and diet changes in sea turtles. Dr. Mota uses different analytical techniques ranging from mass spectrometry, DNA sequencing, stable isotope analyses, and standard histology. Dr. Mota is also collaborating with other sea turtle biologists and deploying satellite transmitters to track the movements of male green turtles during the breeding and nesting season. Several National University undergraduate students are currently involved in sea turtle research with Dr. Mota and he always welcomes new ones.

Mota, M. 2012. Is Polycythemia a Sea Turtle Adaptation to Low Oxygen Concentrations During Incubation? In T. Tucker, L. Belskis, A. Panagopoulou, A. Rees, M. Frick, K. Williams, R. LeRoux, and K. Stewart (Eds.) Proceedings of the 33rd Annual Symposium on Sea Turtle Biology and Conservation. NOAA Technical Memorandum NMFS-SEFSC-645:14.

Mota, M., R. Dean, and R. Carthy. 2008. Clutch Temperature Prediction: Modeling Sun, Sand and Sea Turtle Sex. In A. Rees, M. Frick, A. Panagopoulou, and K. Williams (Eds.) Proceedings of the 27th Annual Symposium on Sea Turtle Biology and Conservation. NOAA Technical Memorandum NMFS-SEFSC-569, 262:245-246.

Mota, M., Foley, A. Dean, R., and R Carthy. 2008. Native and Nourished Beach Sand Properties and their Relationship to Sea Turtle Nesting Success in Florida. In H. Kalb, A. Rohde, K. Gayheart, and K. Shanker (Eds.) Proceedings of the Twenty-Fifth Annual Symposium on Sea Turtle Biology and Conservation. NOAA Technical Memorandum NMFS-SEFSC-582, 204:144.

Fox, S. and M. Mota. 2008. To Fluff or Not To Fluff, That is The Beach Nourishment Question! In A. Rees, M. Frick, A. Panagopoulou, and K. Williams (Eds.) Proceedings of the 27th Annual Symposium on Sea Turtle Biology and Conservation. NOAA Technical Memorandum NMFS-SEFSC-569, 262:233.

Mota, M. and R Carthy. 2006. Nourished Beach Biology and Dynamics. In M. Frick, A. Panagopoulou, A. Rees and K. Williams (Eds.) Book of Abstracts, 26th Annual Symposium on Sea Turtle Biology and Conservation. International Sea Turtle Society, Athens, Greece. 376:148.

Mota, M and R Carthy. 2004. Modeling Sea Turtle Clutch Temperature and Development Based on Air Temperature and Sand Characteristics. In R. Mast, B. Hutchinson, and A. Hutchinson (Eds) Proceedings of the Twenty-Fourth Annual Symposium on Sea Turtle Biology and Conservation. NOAA Technical Memorandum NMFS-SEFSC-567, 205:163-164.

Mota, M. and B. Peterson. 2004. Differences Between Physical Properties of Native and Renourished Beaches and Their Influence on The Gas Concentrations of Oxygen, Carbon Dioxide and Hydrogen Sulfide. In M. Coyne and R. Clark (Eds) Proceedings of the Twenty-First Annual Symposium on Sea Turtle Biology and Conservation. NOAA Technical Memorandum NMFS-SEFSC-528, 368:253-254.

Mota, M. and B. Peterson. 2003. Beach Renourishment and its Impact on Gas Concentrations in Loggerhead Sea Turtle Nests in Florida. In N. Pilcher (Ed) Proceedings of the Twenty-Third Annual Symposium on Sea Turtle Biology and Conservation. NOAA Technical Memorandum NMFS-SEFSC-536. 261:78.

Mota, M., K. Adkins-Holloway, and J. Provancha. 2003. Changes in Loggerhead Demography after 25 years of Nesting on the East Coast of Florida. In, J. Seminoff, (Ed) Proceedings of the Twenty-Second Annual Symposium on Sea Turtle Biology and Conservation. NOAA Technical Memorandum NMFS-SEFSC-503, 308:23.

Mota, M., and B. Peterson. 2003. Beach Renourishement and Sea Turtle Nesting Microenvironemnts. In J. Seminoff (Ed) Proceedings of the Twenty-Second Annual Symposium on Sea Turtle Biology and Conservation. NOAA Technical Memorandum NMFS-SEFSC-503, 308:193-194.

Mota, M and J. Stiner. 2001. The Distribution of the Southeastern Beach Mouse, Peromyscus polionotus niveiventris, in the Southern Region of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. Proceeding of the Florida Academy of Sciences Annual Meeting, St Leo University, Florida.

Mota, M. 2000. The 1999 Hurricane Season and its Impact on Sea Turtle Nesting at Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Florida Academy of Sciences. Melbourne, Florida.

Mota, M. 2000. Baseline Data on the Seaward Orientation of Atlantic Loggerhead (Caretta caretta) and Florida Green (Chelonia mydas) Sea Turtle Hatchlings in a Naturally Lit Beach in East Central Florida. In H. Kalb and T. Wibbels (Eds) Proceedings of the Nineteenth Annual Symposium on Sea Turtle Biology and Conservation. U.S. Dept. Commerce. NOAA Tech. Memo. NMFS-SEFSC-443, 291:166-168.

Mota, M., J. Provancha, and N. Reddick. 1999. The Analysis of Distribution and Behavioral Trends of Dolphins and Manatees in The Northern Banana River, Florida, using GIS. Proceedings of the 13th Biennial Meeting of the Society for Marine Mammalogy. Maui, Hawaii.

Contact Details

College of Letters and Sciences
mmota@nu.edu
858/642-8474